Video: English version of popular UBI video now available

Video: English version of popular UBI video now available

A popular 5-minute introductory video on Basic Income, in English, is now online.

The video was originally made in Spanish, produced by Atxe, a Spanish artist, as a project for Red Renta Basica, the Spanish affiliation of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN), 2 years ago. It gathered a great success reaching more than 5 million people. [1]

Carlos Arias, an activist of the Unconditional Basic Income Europe (UBIE), took the initiative to make an English version, which is now available online. Narration in English was done by Barb Jacobson, former chair of UBIE.

On this occasion, we had a short interview with Atxe to show our respect to the artist who made the probably most watched video on UBI:

– How you were involved in making the video?

Atxe: Basic income is something that has been of my interest for a long time. I had previously done this kind of videos – for instance, on the TTIP – and David Casassas, as a member of Red Renta Básica, suggested me to make one explaining the main ideas that association defends.

– How you do you think of great success of the video?

Atxe: I think basic income is a proposal that creates a lot of controversy and, either you like it or not, it shakes you up. The video deals with issues and problems that speak to a large number of people and that leave you everything but indifferent – especially in Spain, where we are intensely suffering the blow of the crisis. Also, I tried to make a fun and entertaining video, which, I suppose, helped too. I must add to all this that the dissemination campaign we did in social networks – many members of Red Renta Básica and other companions actively participated in it – ended up being really successful – the video became a trending topic fast and kept this position during almost two days.

– What do you think of the idea of UBI?

Atxe: In addition to all the benefits the video talks about and that every basic income supporter knows, basic income is today more relevant than ever because it can break the fear that permeates a large part of our societies. It is a fear that too many times is translated into fuel for the rise of the far-right, and basic income could put an end to this tendency.


[1]  5,423,641 visitors between 22 February 2017 and 30 January 2019 (data provided by Carlos Arias, a Facebook page administrator of Renta Básica Universal)

This article was reviewed by André Coelho.

Europe: European Green Perspectives on Basic Income

Europe: European Green Perspectives on Basic Income

The Green European Foundation (GEF) has published its report on UBI: European Green Perspectives on Basic Income, on 18th February 2019.

GEF is one of the ‘political foundations at European level’ (a.k.a. Eurofoundations) that are research and advocacy organisations funded by the European Parliament.

GEF ran a project ‘Basic Income for all EU citizens?’ for the past two years (2017-2018). This report is one of its outcomes. The report’s forewords by Susanne Rieger and Ville Ylikahri outlines the aim of the project: ‘investigating the [UBI] proposal’s potential in relation to employment, the recognition of work beyond paid work, and the gendered division of the labour’ (p.5). This threefold aim is in sharp contrast to the narrow focus of the Finnish Government experiment run concurrently with the GEF’s project. The Finnish Government only focused on employment and paid no attention to unpaid work and the gender division of labour.

The report contains the accessible introduction, ‘Twelve Questions and Answers on Universal Basic Income’ by Natalie Bennet, a former leader of the Green Party of England and Wales. It is followed by 9 substantial articles. The report’s concluding chapter evaluates the EU-wide UBI proposal from ‘Social Europe’ perspective.

GEF continues to work on UBI with its new project ‘Basic Income – European Public Debate’.

You can access PDF of the report or order a hardcopy here.


Image: GEF’s report on UBI,  from GEF’s homepage.

Article reviewed by Russel Ingram.

Finland: Wellbeing improved: First results of the BI experiment

Finland: Wellbeing improved: First results of the BI experiment

Preliminary results of the basic income experiment, which the Finnish government implemented in 2017-2018,  was presented at Säätytalo, “House of the Estates” (Snellmaninkatu 9-11, Helsinki), on Friday, 8th February 2019, as we reported previously.

Olli Kangas, scientific leader of the study and Professor of Practice at the University of Turku, summed up the result concisely when he was asked by a journalist:

No significant effects on employment, but important effects on well-being.

At the event, Kangas gave an overview of the preliminary finding; Ohto Kanninen, research coordinator at the Labour Institute for Economic Research, spoke on the effects on employment; and Minna Ylikännö, senior researher at Kela, the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, presented on the effects on well-being.

The event can be watched online here, and the summary can be read here.

The final results will be published in 2020.

For what the experiment can and cannot tell us, this piece and literature mentioned in the piece could be helpful. For literature on other experiments, this page might be a good starting point.


Photo: Sauna in Helsinki, CC BY-NC 2.0 Piltti.

Article reviewed by Russell Ingram.

Finland: First results of the BI experiment to be webstreamed: 8 Feb

Finland: First results of the BI experiment to be webstreamed: 8 Feb

Preliminary results of the basic income experiment, which Finish government implemented in 2017-2018,  will be presented at Säätytalo, “House of the Estates” (Snellmaninkatu 9-11, Helsinki), on Friday, 8th February 2019, between 8.30 and 10.30 (time in Helsinki, GMT +2).

The event will be also webstreamed here.

The speakers will be:

  • Pirkko Mattila (Minister of Social Affairs and Health)
  • Anu Vehviläinen (Minister of Local Government and Public Reforms)
  • Olli Kangas (scientific leader of the study and Professor of Practice at the University of Turku)
  • Ohto Kanninen (research coordinator at Labour Institute for Economic Research)
  • Minna Ylikännö (Senior Researher at Kela, the Social Insurance Institution of Finland)

More information can be found here.


Photo: Tram street in Helsinki, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, City Clock Magazine.

Article reviewed by Dawn Howard.

UN Secretary-General endorses UBI

UN Secretary-General endorses UBI

The Secretary-General of the United Nations endorses UBI on 25th September 2018.

António Guterres, the UN Secretary-General, urged world leaders to consider Unconditional Basic Income in his speech at the General Assembly of the UN.

After drawing the audience’s attention to the consequences of current technological innovation for the labour market, Guterres said:

The very nature of work will change. The governments may have to consider stronger social safety nets, and eventually Universal Basic Income.

The UN has dispatched the video of his address here and the above statement can be heard around 15m 25s.