Webinar: Towards a Universal Basic Dividend – 12:00 CEST June 13

Webinar: Towards a Universal Basic Dividend – 12:00 CEST June 13

Earth for All: A Survival Guide for Humanity introduces Citizen Funds and a Universal Basic Dividend (UBD) as bold proposals to reduce inequality, increase wellbeing, and boost creativity and innovation in a time of social and economic upheaval.  

This webinar will delve into the core concepts, potential benefits, and real-world applications of UBD as a transformative policy drawing on the experiences of our expert panel. We will explore: 

  • The fundamentals of Universal Basic Dividend 
  • Its potential to address economic inequality and enhance wellbeing 
  • The potential impact of UBD on sustainability and environmental   stewardship 
  • Case studies and evidence from around the world 

The panel:  

Sarath Davala is an Indian sociologist, and President of Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN). He is co-author of the book: Basic Income: A Transformative Policy for India and contributing author to the Earth4All deep-dive paper Unconditional cash transfers and the five turnarounds: beneficiaries’ perspectives. He was Research Director of the Madhya Pradesh Basic Income Pilot (2010-2014) and is currently co-director of WorkFREE, a Basic Income pilot with waste collectors in Hyderabad. He is the co-founder of India Network for Basic Income and Mission Possible 2030 – both working on promoting informed conversation about Basic Income. 

Ken Webster is a Visiting Professor at Cranfield University and a Fellow of CISL (Cambridge University Institute for Sustainability Leadership). From 2010 – 2018 he was Head of Innovation for the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a circular economy pioneer organisation where he helped shape current notions of a ‘circular economy’, and is the founder of the Society for the Circular Economy. He a member of Earth4All’s Transformational Economics Commission, contributing author of Earth for All: A Survival Guide for Humanity, and lead author of three Earth4All deep-dive papers on Universal Basic Dividend.  

Caroline Whyte has a background in ecological economics and does research and advocacy for Feasta, the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability. She has a particular interest in global environmental justice, Just Transition and financial system reform. She contributed to Feasta’s books Fleeing Vesuvius and Sharing for Survival. Along with four other Feasta Climate Group members she helped to launch the CapGlobalCarbon initiative at the COP-21 summit in Paris in December 2015. She is a steering group member of the Wellbeing Economy Hub for Ireland, which she represents in the European Union Wellbeing Economy Coalition, and she is a member of the Irish National Economic and Social Council. 

To register and send your questions to our panel, click here.

Billionaire backlash shows the power of basic income

Billionaire backlash shows the power of basic income

“Last month, the US state of Iowa enacted a law banning local governments from adopting basic income programmes. This follows similar developments in Arkansas, Idaho, and South Dakota.

In Texas, after lawmakers failed to get their own such law adopted, the state’s attorney general filed a case to prevent Harris County from launching the basic income pilot that its officials had authorised. Declaring the pilot “unconstitutional”, the attorney general has taken his case all the way to the Supreme Court of Texas. What is going on here? And why do the intricacies of seemingly obscure local US politics matter?”

To read the full article for Al Jazeera by Neil Howard, click here.

What can be learned from Australia’s natural experiment with basic income during COVID-19?

What can be learned from Australia’s natural experiment with basic income during COVID-19?

Photo by Amber Weir on Unsplash

Abstract:

“The COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread social and economic policy experimentation as governments sought to protect household finances while locking down economies. Cash transfers emerged as one of the most popular policy measures, leading many to reflect on new possibilities for enacting universal basic income through temporary or emergency interventions. We take Australia’s pandemic response, and particularly its Coronavirus Supplement, as an example of this broader experimentation. We analyse the Supplement through the lens of an emergency basic income, arguing the measure reflected existing institutional structures and norms, forms of national and international policy learning, and vulnerabilities in Australia’s liberalized housing and labour markets. While temporary, we consider how its apparent success might suggest ongoing policy relevance, either as a form of capitalist “crisis management” or as an alternative pathway for implementing forms of basic income.”

To read the. full article, click here.

An article to better inform the debate about the amount of UBI

An article to better inform the debate about the amount of UBI

Because Elon Musk has decided to start talking about a concept he refers to as “universal high income” as being different and seemingly better than universal basic income, I feel the need to set the record straight here.

Simply put, universal high income is a universal basic income that is high enough to be considered “high.” Universal basic income is not a low universal income.

As defined by the Basic Income Earth Network, the international organization founded in 1986 to foster informed discussion around the world about the topic of basic income, the current definition of basic income is “a periodic cash payment unconditionally delivered to all on an individual basis, without means test or work requirement.”

To read the full article, click here.

Basic Income for the Arts in Ireland – What have We Learned after 20 months?

Basic Income for the Arts in Ireland – What have We Learned after 20 months?

This is to announce the fourth in a special series of discussions dedicated to reflecting on what we can learn from the Irish Basic Income for the Arts Pilot Scheme, as it unfolds.
The Government of Ireland is running a Basic Income pilot that began in September 2022. 2000 artists and cultural workers will receive a weekly unconditional income of €325 weekly for a period of three years. This fourth session will be an opportunity to check-in with some of the artists involved in the pilot scheme and learn from them about how it is affecting them and their creative communities.

To learn more and access the links for this fourth discussion and recordings of the previous three, click here.

We’ll need universal basic income – AI ‘godfather’

We’ll need universal basic income – AI ‘godfather’

Photo by Possessed Photography on Unsplash

“The computer scientist regarded as the “godfather of artificial intelligence” says the government will have to establish a universal basic income to deal with the impact of AI on inequality.

Professor Geoffrey Hinton told BBC Newsnight that a benefits reform giving fixed amounts of cash to every citizen would be needed because he was ‘very worried about AI taking lots of mundane jobs’.”

To read the article by Faisal Islam, click here.