Emergency basic income: Distraction or Opportunity – May 16th at 4pm

Emergency basic income: Distraction or Opportunity – May 16th at 4pm

Jurgen De Wispelaere and Francesca Bastagli will explore the implications of Emergency Basic Income (EBI) for social protection systems and its relationship to Universal Basic Income (UBI). They will examine whether EBI can be integrated into existing programs, overcome barriers, and fuel changes towards more generous policies, while also discussing the divided opinions on whether EBI is an opportunity or a distraction for the future development of UBI.

Title: Emergency Basic Income: Distraction or Opportunity?

Date: 16th of May, 4:00 pm (UK time)

Location: Zoom (Click here to join the meeting)

11 U.S. states with guaranteed basic-income programs

11 U.S. states with guaranteed basic-income programs

Photo by Ioann-Mark Kuznietsov on Unsplash

Note: These pilot programs do not meet BIEN’s definition of basic income.

“Ingrid Sullivan, 48, used her cash from the San Antonio guaranteed basic-income program to rent a home where her grandchildren can play in the yard. And Monique Gonzalez, 41, moved herself and her family out of a San Antonio motel.

A Denver resident, Jarun Laws, 51, used his basic income to pay his rent and buy food.

“My life was always just a couple hundred dollars short,” Sullivan told Business Insider. “For the first time, I can breathe.”

Guaranteed basic income has become an increasingly popular poverty-solution strategy in US cities. Over 50 municipalities have tried the GBI model since 2019, offering low-income participants between $100 and $1,000 a month, no strings attached, for a set time period.

To read the full article in Business Insider, click here.

Free cash programs spread in the United States

Free cash programs spread in the United States

“Across the country, city-led guaranteed income programs are delivering unrestricted payments to struggling households, including those ineligible for other aid. Conservative critics are pushing back.

By J.J. McCorvey

Just weeks after Kiki Ramos received her first $500 monthly payment from the Richmond Resilience Initiative, her car was stolen.

“It would have been a big domino effect if I didn’t have this extra money,” she said.

Her damaged vehicle was soon recovered, but without the additional cash, the 33-year-old pharmacy technician couldn’t have afforded to get it fixed or secure a rental in the meantime, given her $1,000 insurance deductible. That would’ve meant figuring out car pools or public transportation to and from work, and little ability to shuttle her boys, ages 12 and 3, to doctor’s appointments and recreational activities.

To read the full article, click here.

Emergency basic income: Distraction or opportunity

Emergency basic income: Distraction or opportunity

“This themed issue, guest-edited by Jurgen De Wispelaere and Troy Henderson, is devoted to examining, first, whether the widespread use of immediate and unconditional cash transfers as a policy response to the socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 crisis has provided a boost to cash transfer programmes generally and to emergency basic income (EBI) policies more specifically. The set of articles then charts the reception of EBI-type policies as a pandemic response in specific country or regional contexts, and reflects on their relevance for the future development of universal social protection and, especially, universal basic income (UBI). While the contribution to be made by basic income to realizing resilient and agile social protection policy responses merits serious consideration, in particular in a context where existing social protection systems are patchy and fragmented, important questions remain as to how to evaluate the time-limited EBI crisis response in light of the more durable needs which a permanent UBI purports to address.”

To access this issue of the International Social Security Review, click here.

Money as Medicine – New England Journal of Medicine

Money as Medicine – New England Journal of Medicine

Photo by Towfiqu barbhuiya on Unsplash

An article by Eric Reinhart, M.D. has been published this month. Teaser:

“What the expanded child tax credit essentially did, at a cost of $128 billion over 1 year (less than 2% of the federal budget, 3% of 2023 U.S. health care spending, or 7% of the 2023 U.S. defense budget), was provide a guaranteed basic income for families with children. For many of the nearly 40 million U.S. residents living in poverty, this provision of public support in the form of basic income didn’t merely reduce poverty; it had a dramatic stabilizing effect and substantially improved their health and experience of everyday life.”

To read and/or download the full article, click here.