New Edition Published: The Palgrave International Handbook of Basic Income

New Edition Published: The Palgrave International Handbook of Basic Income

Edited by Malcolm Torry, this second edition:

  • Contains new chapters on peacebuilding, public health, pilot projects, and the history of basic income
  • Presents a newly updated discussion of the important aspects of the Basic Income debate
  • Assesses the effects of Basic Income schemes in five key areas

Read more about the book and/or purchase it by clicking here.

New Book by Malcom Torry: Unconditional

New Book by Malcom Torry: Unconditional

“Can anything ever be truly unconditional? Can public services such as healthcare or education be unconditional? And can an income ever be unconditional? This incisive book responds to these questions with a qualified ‘yes,’ and considers whether a social policy regime based on unconditionality might ever replace neoliberalism.”

Read more about the book and/or purchase it by clicking here.

How government plans to pay for a Basic Income Grant in South Africa

How government plans to pay for a Basic Income Grant in South Africa

“President Cyril Ramaphosa is looking to try make the shift to a Basic Income Grant a reality following renewed calls in this year’s ANC’s January 8th statement – but questions have arisen as to how the country is going to fund it.

“Millions of working age adults in our country remain unemployed without any form of support and little prospect of gaining employment until economic growth picks up,” said Ramaphosa at the opening address of the the ANC’s 26-29 January 2024 national executive committee (NEC) lekgotla.”

To read the full article, click here.

Results Available: DIRECT CASH FOR A BETTER BOSTON

Results Available: DIRECT CASH FOR A BETTER BOSTON

In partnership with UpTogether, CHV launched a direct cash pilot in 2021, selecting fifty families via lottery from the CHV community to receive an unconditional $583 per month. With this two-year pilot program, Camp Harbor View joined a burgeoning national guaranteed income movement.

Pilot programs and studies in more than 100 cities nationally have shown that programs that offer a steady source of income for low-income or historically marginalized communities, with minimal strings attached, led to major leaps in wellbeing and opportunity.

A few highlights and impact stories from this pilot click here.

To read the report, click here.

Tackling Homelessness with Unconditional Cash Transfers

Tackling Homelessness with Unconditional Cash Transfers

When? Thursday, 22 February 2024 at 6:30-8 pm UK time
UBI Lab Manchester invites to an online discussion with three eminent speakers about unconditional cash transfers and homelessness:

Frances Darlington-Pollock CEO of the Greater Manchester Mayor’s Charity will open with an overview of the present homelessness situation across Greater Manchester
Mark Donovan Founder & Executive Director of the Denver Basic Income Project will tell us about the exciting interim results in Denver where homeless people are making great changes in their lives thanks to regular cash pay-outs
Jonathan Tan Co-Founder & CEO of Greater Change will outline the success his organisation has had in giving out one-off payments to people who are homeless in Oxford and London.

Register here.

Health inequity is a problem, UBI could be a solution

Health inequity is a problem, UBI could be a solution

Photo by National Cancer Institute on Unsplash

“In May 2023, academic and policy experts in social protection, economics, public health, history, and ethics gathered at the Brocher Foundation in Geneva to consider the potential for Universal Basic Income (UBI) to contribute to health equity.

Health inequities have long been a recognised global problem. In 2013, a review of countries covering 74% of the world’s population found substantial variation in health outcomes according to income, education, sex, and migrant status. Achieving health equity is a moral imperative and necessary to fulfil the human right to health. Health inequalities cannot be solved by the health sector alone – achieving health equity requires addressing the social determinants of health that largely involve social domains beyond health, such as social security, education, housing, and issues such as domestic and sexual violence and abuse, race and class prejudice, adverse employment conditions, the physical environment, and climate change.

Read the full article here.