100 Pilots: Guaranteed Income Achieves Historic Milestone in the U.S.

100 Pilots: Guaranteed Income Achieves Historic Milestone in the U.S.

In September, 2022, the Economic Security Project (ESP) announced that it had hit a milestone of 100 guaranteed income pilots announced nationwide. See a two-minute video celebrating this achievement here.

In 2017, ESP helped launch pilots in Stockton, CA and Jackson, MS and then open-sourced the playbook and invited others to join the movement. To go from a distant dream to such a large number of pilots did not happen overnight, it took the dedicated work of people committed to this vision.

ESP “advocates for ideas that build economic power for all Americans. We legitimize bold ideas by supporting cutting edge research and elevating champions, win concrete policy victories for the communities that need to see change now, and provoke the conventional wisdom to shift what’s considered possible. Our team of academics, organizers, practitioners and culture makers disburse grants, run issue campaigns, develop creative interventions and research products, and convene to encourage investment and action from others.” 

100 U.S. Mayors, 100 Pilots: Guaranteed Income Now

100 U.S. Mayors, 100 Pilots: Guaranteed Income Now

The 2022 Guaranteed Income Now summit was an opportunity to mark the movement’s recent progress — there are now officially 100 mayors who have joined Mayors for a Guaranteed Income and 100 pilots announced in the United States.

The 2-day summit in Atlanta brought together pilots, policymakers, researchers and more. This event was about getting inspired and recognizing the work that the US Income Movement community has been doing, Check out the clip below featuring Mayor Melvin Carter, the mayor of St. Paul, Minnesota.

On the pilot side, an exciting new tool debuted during the summit: Stanford Basic Income Lab’s Guaranteed Income Pilots Dashboard. This dashboard was designed to visualize data from 30+ guaranteed income pilots across the United States. It also includes testimonies from participants, which shed light on ways in which unconditional cash is giving people the freedom to build financial security and change their own lives for the better. Explore the dashboard here.

Bristol Ideas Conference October 12: Back to Basics

Bristol Ideas Conference October 12: Back to Basics

Leading thinkers, politicians and policymakers come together to debate and explore basic income pilots, macro-economic models, the prospects for basic income in developing economies, and political economy of social and economic change.

Join Bristol Ideas for ‘Back to Basics: Income for Everyone?’ – the third conference from the University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) and Bristol Ideas, supported by the Basic Income Forum.

In recent years, interest in basic income has grown around the world. Basic income is an unconditional income paid to every individual. It is a payment that is not means-tested or made conditional on work-status. Advocates of basic income argue that it represents a fair, simple and efficient way of supporting individuals, in contrast to the complexity and intrusiveness of existing welfare states. Many also argue that automation and the rise of precarious work makes a basic income necessary to replace or supplement wage labour.

The Covid-19 pandemic and cost of living crisis has thrown these issues into sharp relief, as governments around the world have scrambled to close gaps in social safety nets and prevent people falling into poverty. At the same time, treasuries and central banks have mobilized the full range of fiscal and monetary policies to prevent today’s crises tipping economies into deep recessions. State intervention in the economy has expanded, while ideological support for austerity has sharply receded. Arguments about whether a basic income is affordable are being made in a dramatically changed intellectual and political context.

Read more here.

FRIBIS Annual Conference 2022

FRIBIS Annual Conference 2022

Basic income has become the subject of a lively and controversial debate in politics, civil society and academia. By questioning the fundamental assumptions of our social interaction, it challenges us to redefine the way we want to live together. At Basic Income and Development, this year’s FRIBIS’ annual conference, we will be taking a closer look at the relationship between basic income and development ideas and the potential they hold for the challenges of both the present and the future.

For decades globalization and neoliberal economic policies have driven social and ecological crises worldwide. The ongoing climate change has not only lead to environmental disasters, but is also causing social crises. The increasing social and economic inequality is resulting in social polarization and increasing support for populist parties. And, as more and more public goods and services have been privatized in favour of economic growth, the risks in the wake of the various global crises have become collective problems. At the same time standards for the management of natural resources and the natural living environment are lacking, as are norms and values for labour markets, health policy and crisis prevention. We also lack sustainable means and mechanisms to establish social, ecological and economic justice.

Given these challenges, we want to explore the extent to which basic income can help to overcome crises and create new perspectives. Could a basic income help us to use environmental resources more sustainably, preserve biodiverse habitats and make social communities more resilient? Would it help people in (post-)conflict regions to build or secure social peace? Or would it rather have the opposite effect, as some critics suggest? What are the potentials and risks of a basic income for development practices in the Global South, and how does this/do they relate to concepts of redistribution and justice? These and other questions will be addressed at this year’s FRIBIS annual conference.

Visit the conference website here.