Category Archives: Academic Articles

Europe: New UBI Research from CESifo

Photo by Stefan Kühn, CC BY-SA 3.0 The CESifo Group of Munich is a European research group that seeks to employ both high-quality economic theory and the methods of an empirical institute. Operating since 1999, CESifo is a collaboration between the Center for Economic Studies (CES), the ifo Institute (“Information and Forschung” or research), and the CESifo GmbH (Munich Society

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Sub-Saharan Africa: Cash transfers have a positive impact on social determinants of health

A systematic review has been published that looks at the effects of cash transfers on social determinants of health and health inequalities in sub-Saharan Africa.   Researchers considered both quantitative (both experimental and quasi-experimental) and qualitative studies to be included in the review. To be eligible for inclusion quantitative studies needed: to be conducted in a population of people in

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Social media: How Twitter affects the discussion of UBI

  A new research study carried out by Jeff Hemsley, Martha Garcia‐Murillo and Ian P. MacInnes investigates how social media affects the discussion and spread of policy and ideas with a case study focus on the topic of Universal Basic Income (UBI). The researchers argue that social media provides an important space for analysis, with Twitter, in particular, being dominated by

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Portugal: survey shows opinion towards basic income change since 2014

A Portuguese civic movement for the promotion of basic income, named RBI-TT, has been collecting answers to a simple questionnaire on basic income, having done so already in 2016 and 2014. This way, it is possible to measure how people’s opinions change over time, at least those that answer the questionnaire online.   The questionnaire sets forth the following questions:

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India: IMF supports basic income, recognising existing welfare programmes as “inefficient”

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has published a report suggesting that basic income would be better than their welfare system at supporting low income households in India. Similar evidence has been found for both Indonesia and Peru, where basic income was found to be beneficial compared to current welfare systems. The report uses 2011-12 National Sample Survey data to analyse the

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Universal Basic Income could directly reduce work-related stress

Dr. Matthew Johnson. Picture credit to: Lancaster University Dr. Matthew Johnson, in an article published on LabourList, examines the effects of universal basic income (UBI) on stress. He co-authors with Elliot Johnson a paper with the title “Stress, domination and basic income: considering a citizens’ entitlement response to a public health crisis”. The paper is partially based on an international

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The Netherlands: Report argues that basic income doesn’t work

Ive Marx. Picture Credit to: University of Antwerp   A news article posted in Flanders Today refers to a report, headed by economist Ive Marx, which concludes that introducing basic income in the Netherlands can actually increase poverty while having only a small effect on inequality. Marx, from the University of Antwerp, concluded that introducing a 700 €/month basic income

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USA: Trump’s response to poverty in the USA

Picture credit to: Big Think.   On the 12th of July 2018, Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) released the report “Expanding Work Requirements in Non-Cash Welfare Programs”, in response to an executive order made in April 2018 on reducing poverty in America.   The poverty rate of 3%, as measured in the CEA report, is at an all-time low.

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Discussion on the future of UBI trials

Picture credit to: iStock   The start of the longest and largest Universal Basic Income (UBI) experiment in Kenya and the approaching end of the trial in Finland spark a new discussion among experts on the effects of ‘no-strings attached’ money transfers.   An article published in Nature in May 2018 discussed the importance of randomized trials in informing researchers

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United Kingdom: Study suggests that welfare conditionality does more harm than good

  The Welfare Conditionality (WelCond) project recently released a report on how people receiving benefits in the UK experience welfare conditionality within a social security system. Welfare conditionality is where a person’s eligibility for benefits is dependent on meeting certain requirements, for example attending regular interviews, which will be taken away if a person does not meet the latter.  

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