Tag Archives: United Kingdom

Citizens Income Trust (UK), The Citizen's Income Newsletter, Issue 3 for 2012

The latest edition of the Citizens Income Newsletter contains an editorial, the research note: “A Citizen’s Income scheme’s winners and losers” by Malcolm Torry, a review essay: “The message of James Robertson’s Future Money” by Conall Boyle,” book reviews, a viewpoint: “Why Austerity is the Wrong Answer to Debt” by Geoff Crocker, and more.

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Hirsch, Donald. Does the tax and benefit system create a ‘couple penalty’?

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation has published a new report, Does the tax and benefit system create a ‘couple penalty’? ‘The use of the MIS [Minimum Income Standard] scale, which uses research into minimum living costs to show greater economies of living in a couple than the official equivalence scales, suggests that separation penalties are larger and couple penalties smaller than

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Adam, Stuart and James Browne, Reforming Council Tax Benefit

The Institute for Fiscal Studies has published a report, Reforming Council Tax Benefit, which reviews the Government’s plan to localise Council Tax Benefit: ‘Universal Credit is intended to simplify the benefit system by reducing the number of different benefits that claimants and administrators must contend with. Keeping council tax support (the means-tested benefit with the largest number of recipients) separate

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OPINION: Funding Citizen’s Income by Seigniorage: The message of Future Money from James Robertson

The ‘sensible’ view of Citizen’s Income (CI) is that it would pool income tax allowances and welfare benefits, as far as possible, into a single uniform payment, varying only with age paid to every citizen, without conditions, funded in the main by income tax. This model has been studied extensively, and can be discussed with policy makers and advisors who understand the mechanisms and procedures involved. But politically this is a complete non-starter: In his latest book Future Money, James Robertson comments “The conventional assumption has been that there is no way of funding a Citizen’s Income except by taxing people’s other incomes highly, and it might have to be at a rate as high as 70%. For many years that has been seen as ruling out a Citizen’s Income. Like many objections to otherwise desirable proposals, the assumption is due to inability or unwillingness to think outside a narrow box

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DORLING, Danny (2012), The no-nonsense guide to equality…

This new book by Danny Dorling (University of Sheffield) includes a 8 pages discussion of basic income in the British context. Dorling seems to be very supportive of the idea, including at EU-level: “Imagine how much money would be saved”, he writes, “if a basic income one day replaced all the numerous different benefit and taxation systems existing accross the

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Kaletsky, Anatole, “How about quantitative easing for the people?” Reuters: Opinion, August 1, 2012

In an opinion piece on its Reuters blog, British columnist and economist Anatole Kaletsky effectively endorses a one-time basic income as a fair and more effective version of central banks “quantitative easing” programmes. Kaletsky shows how the United States created $2 trillion and the United Kingdom created £375 billion pounds out of thin air to buy bonds in two rounds of “quantitative easing.”

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Review: Paul Spicker, How Social Security Works: An introduction to benefits in Britain

Paul Spicker, How Social Security Works: An introduction to benefits in Britain, Policy Press, 2011, xii + 284 pp, hbk 1847428110, £65, pbk, 1847428103, £23.99 This well-organised book is what it says it is: an ‘introduction’ to the ‘design, management, operation and delivery of benefits’ (p.ix). Its careful structure enables Spicker to bring a sense of order to a system

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Harrop, Andrew (2012) The Coalition and Universalism: Cuts, targeting and the future of welfare.

The Fabian Society has published The Coalition and Universalism: Cuts, targeting and the future of welfare, by Andrew Harrop. ‘Universal provision funded by proportionate or progressive taxation actually leads to a transfer from richer families to poorer ones. … on average the amount redistributed to the poor actually decreases as welfare states become more targeted. Any increase in redistribution from

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