Greece: Left-wing party SYRIZA advocates a basic income

The Greek political party SYRIZA, a coalition of radical left-wing political movements, has recently attracted huge media attention accross Europe.  At the occasion of the May 2012 general elections, it became the second largest party in the Greek parliament, and its leader Alexis Tsipras was even asked to form a new government.  Like two other party leaders, he failed to do so, and new legislative elections are to be held in Greece on June 17th, 2012.

Interestingly, in its electoral platform, SYRIZA explicitly mentions the idea of an uncondictional basic income (ελάχιστο εγγυημένο εισόδημα). The relevant paragraph reads:  “‘Diverse fragmentary reforms and policies must be united in a national system of guaranteed funds from the national budget. An unconditional basic income, accomodation with heating, electricity and telecommunications, food and clothing, transport, help at home, legal coverage and representation can thus become rights of all citizens.” (translation by Nicholas Vrousalis).

The platform is at:
http://www.syriza.gr/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=1853&Itemid=170

Basic income makes its appearance under point (7.)

About Yannick Vanderborght

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2 comments

  • Manos Matsaganis

    Just to make clear that what SYRIZA advocated is a (means-tested) guaranteed minimum income.
    This is welcome: Greece is the only EU member state in which a GMI does not yet exist at national or local level anywhere in the country (a minimum income pilot is to be launched in 2014 in two localities).
    In any case, nor SYRIZA not any other party have come out in favour of an unconditional basic income (nor do they know what it is).
    This could change: yesterday we held the first ever public meeting in Athens to discuss basic income. About 30-40 people turned up, which must be counted as a success.
    [A short note describing the event is on the way.]

  • I’ve send a proposal in a powerpoint on how unconditional basic income could be introduced in a controlled manner using a complementary currency next to the euro in Greece. You can find the powerpoint in the following link. It is a facebook page solely intented to enable the powerpoint to be communicated. https://www.facebook.com/groups/682286141897155/

    I sincerely hope it can make a difference.

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